Bees

INSECTS: Adults fly. Important types are carpenter bees (damage wood), bumble bees, and honey bees (need professional treatment if nest is inside a structure). Most species are yellow and black and fuzzy (wasps are not fuzzy).

Bumble Bees

A bumble bee (also written as bumblebee) is any member of the bee genus Bombus, in the family Apidae. There are over 250 known species, existing primarily in the Northern Hemisphere although they are common in New Zealand and in the Australian state of Tasmania.

Bumble bees are social insects that are characterised by black and yellow body hairs, often in bands. However, some species have orange or red on their bodies, or may be entirely black. Another obvious (but not unique) characteristic is the soft nature of the hair (long, branched setae), called pile, that covers their entire body, making them appear and feel fuzzy. They are best distinguished from similarly large, fuzzy bees by the form of the female hind leg, which is modified to form a corbicula: a shiny concave surface that is bare, but surrounded by a fringe of hairs used to transport pollen (in similar bees, the hind leg is completely hairy, and pollen grains are wedged into the hairs for transport).

Like their relatives the honey bees, bumble bees feed on nectar and gather pollen to feed their young.

Carpenter Bees

Carpenter bees resemble bumblebees in both size and appearance, but are not social insects. They construct their nests in trees or in frame buildings. Most of the top of the abdomen of carpenter bees is without hairs and is shiny black in color. By contrast, the abdomen of bumblebees is fully clothed with hairs, many of them yellow in color. If you see a number of large bees hovering near the eaves of the house or drilling in wood, you have carpenter bees. There is only one species of the large carpenter bees, Xylocopa virginica, which is encountered in Pennsylvania.

Honey Bees

Honey bees (or honeybees) are a subset of bees in the genus Apis, primarily distinguished by the production and storage of honey and the construction of perennial, colonial nests out of wax. Honey bees are the only extant members of the tribe Apini, all in the genus Apis. Currently, there are only seven recognized species of honey bee with a total of 44 subspecies, though historically, anywhere from six to eleven species have been recognized. Honey bees represent only a small fraction of the approximately 20,000 known species of bees. Some other types of related bees produce and store honey, but only members of the genus Apis are true honey bees.

Generally, a house will get bees every 30 to 40 years, but if their habitats from previous stays are not destroyed, they will come back very frequently. That’s why it’s important to not only hire professionals to eliminate existing bees, but to also take measures to keep them from returning. Bees can be dangerous, especially for people allergic, young children and pets, with their painful stings. They can also damage homes by nesting directly in wood and outdoor crevices.
WARNING! Bees should be considered armed and dangerous.
Do not attempt to exterminate them by yourself.
Contact Marlboro Pest Control immediately at (508) 485-3721.
61 Boston Post Road East, Marlborough, MA 01752 • 1-508-485-3721 • marlboropest@verizon.net